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Merchant Services Sales Presentation | Selling Merchant Services
Tuesday, May 26 2020

Have you already analyzed all of your costs and you're ready to come to the merchant with your offer? Have you been wondering how to present it in the best way possible? It's important to keep a few guidelines in mind when you are making the presentation:

1. Assume that the “yes” was already said. The point of your presentation is to show the merchant all the details, not to make a close. Why? They are listening to you, so they are probably already sold. Make that assumption, and you'll be less prone to pushy sales tactics that will turn them off. After all, why wouldn't they buy from you if you're giving them the best deal?

2. While you are going over the fees with the merchant, keep things simple. They really don't need to know all the dirty details, and honestly they probably don't care and will just get confused. Point to some of the main critical items and discuss those, but don't get long-winded unless they ask. When comparing yourself to your competitors, by the way, it will seem suspicious and dishonest to the merchant if you don't throw in one or two negative things about your plan—just make it obvious that the good things overwhelm them.

3. Show your merchant their long-term savings. Avoid focusing on what they will save per month, and instead bring up the big picture, such as what they will save in a year or two years. These big numbers are not only more impressive, they are also the ones that matter to their business ultimately.

Explain your reasoning step by step as well, and how much you think they will save over the lifetime of the account. Bring up examples of what they could in turn invest that money in instead of credit card processing fees. Make the savings very concrete.

Finally, when you close, ask if they have any questions. This puts the ball in their court and makes them feel like there is transparency and obviousness in the interaction. If they have no questions, it also lets you know that you have done what you need to do.

4. Now you're ready to get to the paperwork. This is one of the most critical periods in the presentation, since you are changing modes and making the deal into a reality. Because of this, you need to use something that won't intimidate the prospect. If you very obviously ruffle around for paperwork and contracts and the like, the merchant could start to over-think things because the situation is getting “official.” Instead, make a smooth, quick transition to the paperwork. In fact, have the paperwork already out (under the cost analysis material that you were presenting), and you don't have to worry about this transition at all.

Once you quickly have laid out the paperwork, start immediately helping them to work through it. Ask some simple questions, like what the official name of their business is, what their legal name is, their address, and other details that make it obvious what you are doing. If they have a problem or object to your moving forward, don't worry, they will voice it! Otherwise, go until they say “no.”

5. Where you are more likely to meet resistance, of course, is when you have to input private information. Obviously, you don't know the merchant's bank account number or their SSN, and they probably don't want you to know it, either. In this case, give the merchant a pen and slide the paper towards them. Clearly indicate the section and have them fill it out, and always look away while they are writing the numbers. Don't make a show of it—just check your phone or something, or have some other polite excuse to not look at them until they are done. This private information is “inside” material, and people feel intimidated when “outsiders” get too close, so make it obvious that you're giving them space, or they may become hesitant, which is the last thing that you need.

6. Remember the follow up. When you successfully get them to sign, that's not the end of the story. You shouldn't suddenly abandon them just because you got what you wanted. Tell them that you're happy to work with them and ask them if they have any other questions. Stay with them for a bit to reassure them that their decision was the right one.

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